Dezaemon Kids! is a unique sequel in a series that lets users create, play, and share shooting games. This version has a simplified pictorial editing interface with upgraded level designs and over 100 sample games that are worth the price of admission alone.

Aspiring designers can draw their characters or simply select from a collection of pre-made images. A level-design engine can craft the game around your world vision. Parallax-scrolling and vertical shooters are the program’s strengths and clever designers will be able to program very intricate games.

This version includes a fully-voiced tutorial, simplified interface, a huge amount of sample data, a horizontal scroll option, and 2-player simultaneous play options. Best of all, your purchase includes 102 great sample games, of which, Kagero is flat-out awesome.

Video

Download Dezaemon Kids! on PSN

Buy Now on PSN This title can be played on PS3, PSP and PlayStation Vita as a Cross-Buy title.
Dezaemon Kids is the (current) final entry in the Dezaemon make-your-own-shoot-em-up series, brought forth on the Playstation back in 1998 by Athena, and now brought onto the Playstation Network in 2011 by MonkeyPaw Games. In addition to the game's robust editor, Dezaemon Kids comes with something REALLY impressive. A second disc is included with the game, containing a full 102 games created using with the previous PS Dezaemon game (and earlier MonkeyPaw game) Dezaemon Plus. Disc 2 alone is more than worth the price of admission, and with the ability to import the assorted designs from the games presented into the editor in Dezaemon Plus, you have an absolutely INCREDIBLE selection of stuff to make use of.

Dezaemon Kids is like the title says, an attempt to make the series more accessible to a younger audience. As a result, the menus are pretty much ENTIRELY pictorial which means 2 things. Firstly, there's no badly-used English. Secondly, there's no English of any other variety. Explanation is provided by the omnipresent Peron, who ends up being much like Microsoft's Clippy, except in the form of a green rabbit-y sphere thingy that speaks in Japanese.

Basic Controls:

Control Pad: Move Cursor (Edit Mode) , Move ship (Game Mode)

Square Button: Accept, Select (Edit Mode) , Shoot (Game Mode)

Circle Button: Accept, Select (Edit Mode) , Shoot (Game Mode)

Triangle Button: Cancel (Edit Mode) , Bomb (Game Mode)

X Button: Cancel (Edit Mode) , Bomb (Game Mode)

Select Button: Help (hover the cursor over what you want help on) (Edit Mode)

Start Button: Back to previous screen (Edit Mode) , Pause (Game Mode)

R1 Button: Increase Cursor Speed (Edit Mode)

R2 Button (analog nub right on the PSP) : Decrease Cursor Speed (Edit Mode)

Peron & the Peron Menu:

Peron is going to be your chatty little companion for as long as you're playing this game, so you might as well know about what he's here for and his menu. He's located in the bottom-right corner of just about every screen in the game and his primary purpose is to provide help. If you want or need help on a specific button or control in the game, just hover your cursor over it and either wait a few seconds or press Select. Peron will chime in with a cheery Japanese explanation of what that thing does. Select himself to open up the Peron Menu and access game options. From left to right, the options are as follows:

Save (memory card with Red Arrow) : Save your (created) game. Each game will take up a whole virtual Memory Card's worth of space.

Control Settings (looks like a big version of the hand cursor) : Change the cursor speed and button settings. From top to bottom, the settings are as follows:

Cursor Speed (hand-cursor wit speed lines) : Change the Cursor Speed. Options are slow (left) medium (Middle) and fast (right)

Button Settings: Change the button settings for (left to right, top to bottom) Confirming, Cancelling, Speed Up and Speed Down. Select the button you want to assign to the given task. At least one button must be assigned to each task, and each button can only be assigned to a single task.

Vibration: Turn vibration on (Default option) and off.

Game Settings (PS1 non-analog controller) : Change the settings for the Game Mode. Set Vibration on or off (default is on) and change the button settings for shooting and launching bombs.


Peron (Peron... duh) : Change the settings for Peron himself and some other game settings. From top to bottom, the settings are as follows

Written Help Messages: Set whether or not Peron provides a textual message if you need/request help (default is on) .

Spoken Help Messages: Set whether or not Peron provides a verbal message if you need/request help (default is on) .

Help Message Timer: Set how long it takes for a Help message to appear. Options are Slow, Medium (default) , and Fast.

Background Scrolling: Turn the editor's (as in the actual background of the editor itself, not any background being edited) background scrolling on and off (Default is on)

Screen Positioning: To the right of the rest of the options and above Peron are buttons that can be used to modify the screen position. The one in the middle recenters the screen.

Sound: Set the sound options for the game. From top to bottom, the settings are as follows:

Stereo/Mono: Set the sound options between Stereo (2 Peron ears) and Mono (1 ear)

BGM: Select which Background Music you want to hear, or the option on the far right for none.

Sound Effects: Turn Sound Effects on (Default) or off.

Load (memory card with green arrow) : Load a created game off the Memory Card. The icons on the bottom of the screen allow you to skip loading a game's graphics, Player/Enemy settings or High Scores.

Main Menu: The main menu consists of 3 options. You can either play one of the sample games (left option) , view the tutorial (which is pretty thorough, if entirely in Japanese) (middle option) or work on a created game (right option) .

The only thing you really need to know about the Sample Game menu is that each icon represents a game, and the icon in the center of the screen with the Japanese text on it is the User-created game. The tutorial menu is going to be ignored, since its contents are entirely in Japanese, the translation of which is far beyond the scope of this document. Upon opening the game-creation menu, we get... something REALLY strange. This collection of icons and drawings is what passes for a menu, with each one representing a separate element of the game being designed.



Graphics Editing (artist at easel) : Much like in Dezaemon Plus, Dezaemon Kids comes with a fully-featured graphics/animation editor. This is where any and all original graphics you want to create get... created. The main area of the editor is the Paint Window. At the very top-right are icons controlling the Zoom level (going from x1 through x2 and x4 to x8) and the Grid lines, with the options for those being off, Sprite-level and Pixel-level. The sprite-level grid lines section the paint window into 16x16-pixel squares, and the Pixel-level grid lines should be self-explanatory. The Pixel-level grid lines will only be visible on the x4 and x8 levels of zoom.

To the left of the Paint Window is the Palette Window. Pressing Square or Circle while hovering over a color will select that color to be used with the current tool. Pressing Triangle or X over a color on the Paint Window will automatically switch your current color to that color to be used with the current tool (if it can be used with the current tool) . The arrows on the bottom of the Palette Window let you scroll through the 256 available colors, 16 at a time. The U-shaped arrows at the top of the Palette Window swaps the window between the Palette Window and the Animation Window (which will be explained later) .

To the right of the Paint Window is the Tool Window. This lets you select which of the graphical tools you wish to use. There are 8 tools in total, the set available to you can be swapped by selecting the U-shaped arrows at the top of the Tool Window. If the tool you select has options (hint: they all do) , they'll pop up in a separate Tool Options window at the bottom of the screen. The tools you have at your disposal are:

Page 1:
Free Drawing (Pencil with line) : This one is pretty easy to use. Press and hold Square or Circle to draw lines. The thickness of the line can be selected in the Tool Options window. Color samples can be taken.

Line Tool(Triangle and ruler) : Press Square or Circle to set an endpoint for the line. Move the cursor to where you want the line's other endpoint to be and press Square or Circle again to draw the line. Press Triangle or X to stop drawing lines. The thickness of the line can be selected in the Tool Options window. Color samples can be taken.

Shape Tool(square and circle) : Press Square or Circle to set a corner for the square (or center for the circle). Move the cursor to where you want to put the other corner for the square (or until the circle has reached the dimensions you want) and press Square or Circle again to draw the circle or square. Press Triangle or X to stop drawing shapes. The specific shape you draw and whether it's hollow or filled can be selected in the Tool Options Window. Color samples can be taken.

Fill Tool(paintbrush and paint-can) : Press Square or Circle to fill the area you want filled with the selected color. The specific pattern to fill the area with can be selected in the Tool Options Window. Note that the paintdrop represents flat color and there are numerous patterns to select from. Use the arrows to scroll between patterns. Color samples can be taken.

Page 2:
Stamp Tool(hand holding stamp) : This tool lets you put a prebuilt 'stamp' design down on the Paint Window. Move the cursor to where you want the center of the stamp and press Square or Circle to place the Stamp. Available stamps are shown in the Tool Options Window. Use the arrows to scroll between available stamps.

Flip/Rotation Tool (Arrows pointing in 4 directions) : Press Square or Circle to set a corner for the selection area. Move the cursor to where you want the other corner for the area, and press Circle or Square again to flip the area. In the Tool Options window, you can select whether the area is flipped horizontally (horizontal arrows) , vertically (vertical arrows) , or rotated (two L-shaped arrows) . If you want to rotate, the selection area must be square.

Cut/Paste Tool (Scissors) : Press Square or Circle to set a corner for the selection area. Move the cursor to where you want the other corner for the area, and press Circle or Square again to Cut the area. Then move the cursor until the selected area is where you want it and press Circle or Square a THIRD time to Paste the area. In the Tool Options Window, you can select whether or not the selection is pasted in a way that it replaces the area it's pasted on (blank pixels in the selected area will replace colored ones in the destination) (leftmost option) , is pasted in a way that it is overlaid atop the area it's pasted on (colored pixels in the destination area will replace blank pixels in the selection) (middle option) , or is moved from the selection area to the destination area (right option) .

Erase All (Bomb) : Selecting this erases everything in the Paint Window. Remember the Undo icon in the upper-left corner of the screen if you select this by accident.

The Animation Window can be accessed by flipping the Palette Window. Press Circle or Square to set one corner of the selection area (minimum 16x16 or one large square) , then move the cursor to where you want the other end of the selection area to be (maximum 64x64 or 16 large squares) and press Square or Circle again to select the area. There will be a large red square attached to your cursor now. Move the square to the Animation area area in the window and it will turn green. Press Square or Circle a third time to paste your selection in the Animation Window. You now have a single frame of animation. Beneath the Animation Window, you can see the current frame number. You can use the arrows next to the frame number to change the current frame. You can have an animation of up to 6 frames.

The Tool Options Window for the consists of a Play and Stop button (obvious enough) and three buttons denoting the speed of the animation. The animation can be slow (left option) , medium (middle option) or fast (right option) .

In the very bottom-left corner of the screen are the Memory (camera) and Sample (white cube with photos on it) buttons. Opening either of these moves the Paint Window to the far-right of the screen and opens the Memory Area in the far left. The Memory Area contains all the graphical assets for the game that's currently being worked on, while the Sample area contains all the available sample art, separated by type. Art can be copied from the Memory or Sample Area to the Paint Window in the same way as it can be copied to or from the Animation Window, and art can be copied from the Paint Window to the Memory Area (but not the sample area) . The Sample Categories are:

Player Ships (space-fighter thing)
All-Purpose Tiny Things (treasure chest)
Explosions (an explosion)
Small Enemies (Mouse, there are 4 pages of these)
Long Enemies (Wiener Dog)
Tall Enemies (Giraffe)
Big Enemies (Whale)
Boss Graphics (Dragon, there are 4 pages of these)
Map Elements (Map, there are 5 pages of these)
Monochrome Graphics (Peron and a pencil)
Text Elements (Japanese character)
Miscellaneous (Text-box with a '?')

Use the arrows to scroll between available categories and press Square or Circle to select the one you want to view. Note that while you can copy things from the Sample area to the Paint Window, you cannot do the inverse.



Player (airplane): In the top-left corner next to the Undo Icon, there are icons with a spaceship and '1' and '2'. The icon highlighted indicates the player that is currently being worked on (yes, Dezaemon Kids supports 2-player games) . Below these icons is a window showing your selected character (and their animation) and to the right of that there are two smaller windows showing the characters weapon type (cannon) bomb type (explosion with a 'B' in the middle) and the graphics for each. You can press either of the buttons to access the relevant sub-windows. At the bottom of the screen is Animation (film with animation of character falling over) button and the Character Speed options (character with speedlines) . The leftmost option is the slowest, and the rightmost is the fastest. At the very far right of the screen is the Test Play option (Magnifying Glass) which lets you send your character through a short loop of a stage with some basic enemies so you can see your animation, weaponry and bombs in action.

Pressing the Animation Icon will move you to the player animation window. In it you will see the Memory Area and the Player's Window, containing the art for when the character is moving up, not moving and moving down (or moving left, not moving and moving right in a side-scrolling game). Art can be copied from the Memory Area to any of these spaces in much the same manner it's copied into the Paint Window in the Graphics Editor. The four icons in the Memory Area here let you access the Graphics Editor (Artist at easel), paste vertically flipped graphics (Vertically-oriented arrows), paste horizontally flipped graphics (Horizontally-oriented arrows), or erase art out of any of the areas in the Player's Window (eraser). Underneath the Players' Window are icons to view the animation in action (Play/Stop).

The Weaponry Select sub-window is opened by pressing the button with the Cannon on it. In this window you can change your weapon type, the graphics of the bullets it fires and the speed of the firing animation. The Weapon Type Selector is directly below the little summary. Use the arrow icons on the sides of the selector to scroll to the specific type of weapon you want, then press Circle or Square to select the weapon type. The 8 available weapon types (and how they behave) are:

Cannon (Blue ball with after-images) : A simple forward-firing cannon. As you gain levels the cannon gains strength and extra bullets start appearing. The extra bullets move in a spiral pattern.

Wide Vulcan (Three bullets firing in a spray)  : A Spread-gun. It starts with 2 side-by-side bullets firing straight ahead, gaining additional/larger bullets and a wider firing arc as it gains levels.

Straight Vulcan (Three bullets firing in a line): A forward-firing gun. Like the Wide Vulcan it starts with 2 side-by-side bullets firing straight ahead, but as it gains levels you also gain little sub-fighters in addition to extra bullets. The sub-fighters will shoot in the direction opposite the one you last pushed on the controller (you push left, they shoot right, etc) . Holding the Fire Button down will allow you to move without altering their orientation.

Missile (Two missiles): Forward-firing missiles. As you gain levels you gain additional missiles and a slightly wider firing arc, as well as little homing missiles that will track nearby targets.

Homing (A curving green laser): A stream of homing shots. These will track any on-screen enemy and do damage for several seconds or until the enemy is destroyed, whichever comes first. As the weapon gains levels it will fire more and stronger bullets.

Laser (A blue laser leaving after-images of itself): A forward-firing laser. Using this will stretch out the graphic you selected so it fills the entire screen width-wise (or lengthwise, depending on whether the scrolling is horizontal or vertical). The beam will leave 'after-images' as you move which can still damage enemies that they come into contact with. As the weapon gains levels, more of these after-images appear and you get sub-fighters that function identically to the ones granted by the Straight Vulcan.

Wave (three blue arcs that grow wider as they move farther out):  This power gives you two sub-fighters that will shoot little wave-shaped projectiles. The fighters will change their orientation around your ship depending on how you move. In a Horizontal shooter, press Left to make them move towards the front of the ship, and Right to make them move towards the back. In a Vertical shooter, press Up to make them move towards the rear of the ship, and Down to make them move towards the front. Hold the fire button while moving to make them stay where they are relative to you. If both of them are shooting in the same direction, their shots will combine into a single larger, stronger shot. Gaining levels in this weapon will increase the size and power of the shots (both individual and combined).

Rebound (A green shot bouncing off the edges of the icon): This weapon will also give you a pair of sub-fighters that will move around you like the ones granted by the Wave power. It will also give you bullets that will ricochet off any enemy they hit until they leave the screen. Gaining levels in this weapon increases the speed and power of the shots fired.

Under the Weapon Selector is another Animation button. Pressing it takes you to the Weapon Animation Window where you can edit the speed of the animation (left option is slow, right option is fast, middle is default), and set the art for each frame of the 4-frame animation (first frame is on the left, last is on the right).

The Bomb Select sub-window is opened by pressing the button with the Explosion on it. In this window you can change your bomb type, the graphics of the effects and the speed of the bombs' animation. The Bomb Type Selector is directly below the little summary. Use the arrow icons on the sides of the selector to scroll to the specific type of bomb you want, then press Circle or Square to select the bomb type. The 8 available bomb types (and how they behave) are:

Barrier Bomb (Spaceship covered in an energy-shield): Creates a shield surrounding your character that makes you temporarily invincible and leaves a trail of after-images. Any enemy touching your character or the after-images will take damage.

Wide Bomb (Large, circular red explosion): Creates an explosion that covers the screen and damages/destroys all enemies thereon. Note that there is no art for this bomb, selecting it replaces the animation control with a simple selector for the color of the explosion.

Search Bomb (Two blue lines ending in circular green explosions): Fires a laser that will scan up and down the screen, auto-targeting any enemies nearby until they are destroyed or the bomb's effect ends. Note that there is no art for this bomb, selecting it replaces the animation control with a simple selector for the color of the explosion.

Straight Bomb (Solid blue line with a rounded edge): Fires a wide (about ½ screen-width/height) laser that slowly narrows down to nothing. Note that there is no art for this bomb, selecting it replaces the animation control with a simple selector for the color of the explosion.

Quick Bomb (Spaceship inside of a huge explosion): Creates a spinning explosion centered on your current location that expands to fill the screen.

Slow Bomb (Spaceship with a huge explosion in front of it): Fires a small bomb that goes about halfway across the screen before exploding.

Big Bomb (Small spaceship growing into a much larger spaceship): Turns your character gigantic (about ½ screen-width/height) and temporarily invincible. Anything that touches it will take damage. Note that there is no art for this bomb, due to it being based off your character's art.

Wave Bomb (Picture of a large wave): Sends a wave of the bomb-graphics across the length/width of the screen, trailed by explosions.

Under the Bomb Selector is another Animation button (if you selected a bomb-type that has animations). Pressing it takes you to the Bomb Animation Window where you can edit the speed of the animation (left option is slow, right option is fast, middle is default), and set the art for each frame of the 4-frame animation (first frame is on the left, last is on the right).



Power-Ups (cluster of icons including meat and 'P' capsule):

There are 6 types of power-ups: Weapon Power Increase (cannon with a 'P'), Speed Increase (Character with speed-lines), Extra Bomb (explosion with a 'B'),  1-up (character with a '1UP') and two “Bonus” items (eggplant and stick... it's a pun in Japanese, that's all you need to know) which give extra points. Exactly how many points they give can be edited here by selecting the point-value you want. At the bottom-left corner is another Animation button that allows you to select the art for each power-up.

Enemy Bullets (grinning missile): This window allows you to set the speed and art for each of the enemy bullet types. The speed options for the current bullet type are shown to the right of the preview window, and the animation button is in the bottom-left corner of the Enemy Shot Window. Note that in the Animation Window for this particular area it is possible to scroll through the bullet types that have modifiable art. The Enemy Shot Window itself also has a selector on the bottom that can be used to scroll through the bullet types. The 8 bullet types (and their behavior) are as follows:

Bullet Type 1 (Red/Yellow projectile): Standard bullet. Travels straight once fired.

Bullet Type 2 (Red/Yellow projectile with white impact mark): Standard Bullet. Travels straight once fired. Can be shot for 10 points.

Standard Missile (Missile traveling straight ahead): Missile weapon. Pauses briefly and accelerates in the direction fired. Can be shot for 10 points.

Homing Missile (Missile curving around): Missile Weapon. Moves toward player, turning in mid-air within a few seconds of launch. Can be shot for 10 points.

Standard Laser (Blue laser beam): Laser Weapon. Goes straight once fired.

Homing Laser (Curving blue beam): Laser Weapon. Gradually turns to intercept player. How fast it turns depends on how close the player is.

Fire (Blast of flame): Short-range flamethrower. Multiple flame projectiles are shot, gradually getting larger before vanishing. Each flame projectile can be shot for 10 points.

Beam Laser (Red Vertical Laser): Laser Weapon. Charges momentarily before being fired. Note that there is no art for this weapon, only a selector for the color of the beam.

Beam Laser 2 (Blue Vertical Laser): Laser Weapon. Charges momentarily before being fired. Firing lasts longer than the other one. Laser can be shot to shorten it and grant 10 points per segment it is shortened by.



Bosses (giant 4-eye monster thingy): Upon selecting this option you will be presented with a menu asking which levels' boss you wish to alter. After selecting which boss you want to modify (the buttons are labeled 1-6 so there's no confusion), you will be taken to the Boss Creation Screen for that particular level.

Dezaemon Kids supports bosses with multiple forms. In fact, ALL Dezaemon Kids bosses have 2 forms. If you want one with only one, you'd have to set both forms to be identical in terms of art and behavior-patterns. In the upper-left corner next to the Undo icon, there are two icons with numbered flags on them. The currently selected one indicates which form of the boss is currently being worked on.

On the far right of the screen is the Boss Window. This shows the current art for the boss, as well as the origin points for the boss' attacks. Below that is the Animation Icon and the boss' current Size. Note that the boss' size can only be altered in the Boss Art menu accessed by selecting the Animation Icon. There will be a selector with arrows beneath the picture of the boss. The 4 boss sizes (and their dimensions) are Small (small circle/planet, 64x64), Wide (planet with horizontal wing around it, 64x128), Tall (planet with vertical ring around it, 128x64), and Big (Sun, 128x128).

Next to the Animation Button and Boss Size are 4 switches controlling various boss behaviors. From left to right, the switches work as follows.

Air/Ground switch: Determines whether the boss is airborne or ground-borne. Generally speaking, this should always be set to airborne in a horizontally-scrolling game and can be set as you please in a Vertically-scrolling one. Mechanically speaking, this switch determines whether or not the player takes damage upon colliding with the boss. The two options for the switch are:

Plane: Airborne (Collision Damage On)
Tank: Ground-based (Collision Damage Off)

Boss Rotation Switch: This is a purely graphical switch, indicating how (or if) the boss rotates. The five options for this switch and what they mean are:

Radar: The boss will turn to face the player.
Clockwise Loop: The boss continually turns clockwise
Counter-Clockwise Loop: The boss continually turns counter-clockwise
Anchor: Boss does not change rotate or change facing
Ships' Wheel: Boss turns to face the direction it is moving in

Fade Control switch: This is another purely graphical switch, determining fade-in and fade-out effects/timing for the boss. The six options for this switch and what they mean are:

Ghost: There is no fade-in or fade-out
Glowing Yellow Ghost: The boss will continually fade in and out.
Transparent Ghost: The boss will appear semi-transparent.
Ghost Entering through Door: The boss will fade in when it appears.
Ghost Exiting through Door: The boss will fade out when it is defeated.

Boss Size Switch: This switch controls the boss' size as it appears on-screen, rather than the size of the art involved. This lets the boss change size in-between forms. The five options for this switch and what they mean are:

Sprout with x1/2: The boss will be shown at x1/4 its normal size. (vertical and horizontal dimensions halved)
Flower Field with horizontal arrows: The boss will constantly squash and stretch horizontally.
Tall Flower with Vertical Arrows: The boss will constantly squash and stretch vertically.
Flower with x1: The boss will be displayed at its normal size.
3 flowers with x2: The boss will be displayed at x4 its normal size (vertical and horizontal dimensions doubled)

On the right side of the screen is the information for the boss' various attacks. Each form of each boss can have up to 3 attacks. Next to the attack number (character tossing something with a '1', '2', or '3') there are 3 icons indicating the attack behaviors. From left to right, these represent Attack Speed, Attack Pattern and Bullet Type. Select the attack number to open up the control window for that attack, then select the icon showing which part of the attack behavior you wish to alter. Selecting an attack will also activate the numbered Origin Point Marker in the Boss Window. Move the cursor to where on the boss you want the attack to come from and press Circle or Square in order to set the Origin Point for the attack.

The Attack Speed control selects how often the boss attacks. The 'No War' option on the far left means that the boss will not use the attack. From left to right, the other options are 'Slow', 'Medium' and 'Fast'.

The Bullet Pattern control shows the exact pattern the attack will make when it is used. The pictures on the icons are accurate to the actual in-game patterns and do not merit further explanation. There are 15 separate patterns to choose from, the arrows on the sides of the selector can be used to scroll between the options. Beneath the pattern selector is another icon showing a Crosshair. Selecting this icon will make the attack home in on the player's current location, depending on the bullet pattern of course. The pattern will rotate so that the character is always in the path of a bullet that would normally be traveling straight ahead.

The Bullet Type selector allows you to set the bullet being fired as any of the 8 enemy bullet types, as described in the 'Enemy Bullets' section.

Below the controls for the boss' attacks, there is the Boss Movement Control Icon(Character with speedlines). Next to this icon there are 2 icons indicating movement behaviors, the Movement Pattern Icon and the Movement Speed icon. Selecting the Icon will open up the sub-window for the boss' movement control, and selecting either the Movement Pattern Icon or Movement Speed icon will let you modify that part of the boss' movement behavior. The Movement Pattern icons are all pictorial and fairly obvious, however one thing merits further explanation. If the icon has a little arrow icon separate from the line showing the boss' movement, it means that the boss will move until it is even with the players' ship.

To the left of the Movement Controls is the Durability Control (Character flexing). The left-most option is the least durable, the right-most is the most durable. Beneath the Movement Controls is the Score control. Note that each of the boss' forms has different options for this control. The boss' first form can provide 0, 10,000 or 50,000 points, while its second can provide 50,000, 100,000 or 500,000 points.



Enemies (Bat-Thing): Upon selecting this option you will be presented with a menu asking which levels' enemies you wish to alter. After selecting which enemies you want to modify (the buttons are labeled 1-6 so there's no confusion), you will be taken to the Enemy Creation Screen for that particular level.

At the top-left of the screen, next to the Undo icon, there are 4 icons representing the 4 enemy size classes. The Size classes (and their dimensions) are Small (mouse, 32x32), Wide (wiener dog, 32x64), Tall (giraffe, 64x32), and Big (whale, 64x64). Beneath these icons is the Enemy Window, showing the animation for the enemy currently being worked on, and which enemy it is. Dezaemon Kids supports 16 different varieties of Small enemies per level, and 8 varieties of Wide, Tall and Big enemies. Use the arrows on the sides of the selector at the bottom of the Enemy Window to switch between enemy types.

Next to the Animation Button is a set of 4 switches controlling various enemy behaviors. From left to right, the switches work as follows.

Air/Ground switch: Determines whether the enemy is airborne or ground-borne. Generally speaking, this should always be set to airborne in a horizontally-scrolling game and can be set as you please in a Vertically-scrolling one. Mechanically speaking, this switch determines whether or not the player takes damage upon colliding with the enemy. The two options for the switch are:

Plane: Airborne (Collision Damage On)
Tank: Ground-based (Collision Damage Off)

Rotation Switch: This is a purely graphical switch, indicating how (or if) the enemy rotates. The five options for this switch and what they mean are:

Radar: The enemy will turn to face the player.
Clockwise Loop: The enemy continually turns clockwise
Counter-Clockwise Loop: The enemy continually turns counter-clockwise
Anchor: Enemy does not change rotate or change facing
Ships' Wheel: Enemy turns to face the direction it is moving in

Fade Control switch: This is another purely graphical switch, determining fade-in and fade-out effects/timing for the enemy. The six options for this switch and what they mean are:

Ghost: There is no fade-in or fade-out
Glowing Yellow Ghost: The enemy will continually fade in and out.
Transparent Ghost: The enemy will appear semi-transparent.
Ghost Entering through Door: The enemy will fade in when it enters the screen.
Ghost Exiting through Door: The enemy will fade out when it starts to leave the screen.

Enemy Size Switch: This switch controls the enemy' size as it appears on-screen, rather than the size of the art involved. The five options for this switch and what they mean are:

Sprout with x1/2: The boss will be shown at x1/4 its normal size. (vertical and horizontal dimensions halved)
Flower Field with horizontal arrows: The enemy will constantly squash and stretch horizontally.
Tall Flower with Vertical Arrows: The enemy will constantly squash and stretch vertically.
Flower with x1: The enemy will be displayed at its normal size.
3 flowers with x2: The enemy will be displayed at x4 its normal size (vertical and horizontal dimensions doubled)

To the right of the Enemy Window is the control for that particular enemies' attack (character throwing thing). Selecting this control opens a sub-window directly below the control. This is the Attack Control sub-window. Selecting any of the icons above the sub-window (the ones with the arrows pointing at them) will allow you to modify that particular area of attack behavior. From left to right, the controls are the Attack Speed control, the Bullet Pattern control and the Bullet type control.

The Attack Speed control selects how often the enemy attacks. The 'No War' option on the far left means that the boss will not use the attack. From left to right, the other options are 'Slow', 'Medium' and 'Fast'.

The Bullet Pattern control shows the exact pattern the attack will make when it is used. The pictures on the icons are accurate to the actual in-game patterns and do not merit further explanation. There are 15 separate patterns to choose from, the arrows on the sides of the selector can be used to scroll between the options. Beneath the pattern selector is another icon showing a Crosshair. Selecting this icon will make the attack home in on the player's current location, depending on the bullet pattern of course. The pattern will rotate so that the character is always in the path of a bullet that would normally be traveling straight ahead.

The Bullet Type selector allows you to set the bullet being fired as any of the 8 enemy bullet types, as described in the 'Enemy Bullets' section.

Below the controls for the attack, there is the Enemy Movement Control Icon(Character with speedlines). Next to this icon there are 2 icons indicating movement behaviors, the Movement Pattern Icon and the Movement Speed icon. Selecting the Icon will open up the sub-window for the boss' movement control, and selecting either the Movement Pattern Icon or Movement Speed icon will let you modify that part of the enemies' movement behavior. The Movement Pattern icons are all pictorial and fairly obvious, however a few things merit further explanation. Icons with 'STOP' written along the bottom mean that the enemy will move forward at the same rate the screen scrolls. Icons with a little arrow on the very left of the icon indicate movement patterns that will home in on the player in some fashion. Below the varying Movement Pattern Icons are two MORE icons of blank screens with arrows on the left or right side (or the top and bottom in vertically-scrolling games). These control which side of the screen the enemy will enter from.

To the left of the Movement Controls is the Durability Control (Character flexing). There are 5 options, but all of them are textual. Use the arrows to scroll between the available options. The option with TWO lines of text indicates that the enemy is intangible. You cannot damage it with your weapons, and it cannot damage you by colliding with you. Going from left to right starting with that option, the options are Weak, Medium, Strong, and Invincible. 

Beneath the Movement and Durability controls are the Score (character holding up black ball) and Power-Up (passed-out character with shiny red object) controls. The Score control determines how many points the enemy gives. Each enemy type can give one of three different amounts of points, which differ with the class of enemy. The Power-Up control determines whether or not that enemy type drops a power-up. It can either drop no power-up (Red X and 'No Item'), or any of the 6 power-up types listed in the Power-Ups menu.

In the bottom-left corner of the screen is the Animation Button. Pressing it takes you to the Animation screen where the speed of the animation and art for the 4 frames of the enemy animation can be set. Note that at the bottom of the Enemy window here there is a selector letting you scroll through the enemy types in the current Enemy Class.



Explosions (Explosion): Determines the art for explosions, as well as the method in which enemies are blown up. Opening the window shows a preview window for the explosion animation, three icons indicating exploding-enemy behavior, and the Animation Icon. From left to right, the three behavior icons are:

Simple Explosion (Yellow/Orange explosion): The destroyed enemy vanishes in a cloud of explosion graphics.

Crash Explosion (Plane trailing smoke): The destroyed enemy falls toward the bottom of the screen, trailing explosion graphics until it is either shot again or reaches the bottom of the screen, at which point it vanishes in a cloud of explosion graphics.

Comedic Explosion (Orange/Yellow explosion with stars and Japanese text): There is a cloud of explosion graphics and the enemy is sent flying off-screen.

The Animation window for explosions is functionally identical to the windows for other animations, however the explosion animations can be up to 6 frames in length.



Levels (skyscraper, castle, volcano):
Upon selecting this option you will be presented with a menu asking which level you wish to alter. After selecting which level you want to modify (the buttons are labeled 1-6 so there's no confusion), you will be taken to the Level Creation screen for the level in question.

Up at the top-left corner of the screen, next to the Undo icon, there are two icons representing the Distant Background Layer(binoculars) and the Foreground/Player Layer(Crane). Selecting either icon will take you to that layer's respective window.

The Distant Background window consists mainly of a preview window showing the currently selected background. Use the arrows to the left and right of the preview window to switch between the 39 available backgrounds.

Beneath the Background Preview window there are the options for the Scroll Speed (car on straight road) and Effect Speed (car on curvy road). The Scroll speed option controls the speed at which the background moves. More arrows means the background scrolls faster. To the right of this option is another button with a single large green arrow on it. This selects the direction in which the screen scrolls. The Effect Speed option controls the speed of the backgrounds' special effect. Note that each background has a differing special effect, usually parallax scrolling, sometimes heat-haze or underwater distortion, sometimes something entirely different. Remember to use the Preview button (Magnifying glass) to see what the effect is before using the background.

Like the Distant Background window, the Foreground window consists largely of a preview window for the level in question. However, the options here are more complex. At the bottom of the preview window is a scrollbar letting you change the area currently being displayed. Just above the preview window are numbers indicating what screen of the level (or fraction thereof) is being displayed. A level can be up to 48 screens long. At the top of the screen are 4 buttons indicating the scroll speeds for the area of the level shown on the preview window. Select one of the buttons to change the scroll speed for that particular section of screen. The 4 options are Stop (Square with 'STOP'), Slow (1 arrow), Medium (2 arrows) and Fast (3 arrows). To the left of the Preview window are 4 more buttons that control speed selections. From top to bottom, these are:

Single Switch (Square Button): When selecting the scroll speed using the buttons on top of the window, only the area governed by THAT button will be affected.

Switches Up To Position (Square button with arrow pointing Left): When selecting the scroll speed using the buttons on the top of the window, the scroll speed will be altered for all the speed selection buttons up to that point.

Switches from Position Onward (Square button with arrow pointing Right): When selecting the scroll speed using the buttons on the top of the window, the scroll speed will be altered for all the speed selection buttons from that point onwards.

All Switches (Square button with arrows pointing in both directions): When selecting the scroll speed with the buttons, the scroll speed will be altered for all switches.

The animation button is in the bottom-left corner of the screen, and can be used to set foreground elements for the level.

To the right of the preview window is the Enemy Placement option (Mouse being held up by tail). Selecting this option will open the Enemy Placement window. When the Enemy Placement window is open, pressing Triangle or X with the cursor hovering over an enemy will “sample” the enemy and allowing you to place another one wherever you desire by pressing Circle or Square. Note that enemies can be placed off the top and bottom of the screen if you want them to enter from there instead of from the direction of scrolling. Enemies set to enter from opposite the direction of scrolling will do so once the area they have been placed has scrolled off the screen.

When the Enemy Placement Window is open, an Enemy Selector will also open. At the top of the screen next to the Enemy Placement button is a selector that lets you change enemy classes, and beneath it is a secondary selector and a preview window that shows you the currently-selected enemy type. Once you've found the enemy type you want to use, move the cursor to the point on the map where you want to place the enemy and place it with Circle or Square. The Wrench icon next to the preview window will take you to the Enemy Modification screen, allowing you to edit the currently-selected enemy type.

Beneath the Enemy Selector there are 4 more icons. From left to right, top to bottom, these icons are:

Copy Enemy Positioning (Two white rectangles with arrow pointing from one to another): This allows you to copy up to an entire screen worth of enemies and foreground objects and paste it in another place on the same screen, or on a different screen altogether. To use the tool, press Square or Circle to set a corner for the selection area. Move the cursor to where you want the other corner for the area, and press Circle or Square again to Copy the area. Then move the cursor until the selected area is where you want it and press Circle or Square a THIRD time to Paste the area.

Move Enemy Positioning (Transparent rectangle with arrow pointing to white rectangle): This allows you to move up to an entire screen's worth of enemies and foreground objects to a different spot on the same screen, or a different screen altogether. To use the tool, press Square or Circle to set a corner for the selection area. Move the cursor to where you want the other corner for the area, and press Circle or Square again to Cut the area. Then move the cursor until the selected area is where you want it and press Circle or Square a THIRD time to Paste the area.

Erase (Eraser): Lets you erase enemies and foreground objects. To use the tool, move the cursor to one corner of the area you want to erase and press Circle or Square. Then move the cursor to the other corner of the area you want to erase and press Circle or Square again to erase the selected area.

Erase All (Bomb): Select this icon to erase all enemies and foreground objects. Remember the undo icon in the top-left if you do this by accident.

Title Screen (signboard):  Allows you to edit the title screen and set the effects.

Up at the top-left corner of the screen, next to the Undo icon are two icons representing the two layers on the title screen. The currently-highlighted icon shows the layer being worked on. The icon with the blue layer on top represents the foreground, and the icon with the blue layer on the bottom represents the background. The window for each layer consists of a preview window on the left side of the screen showing the title art and four selectors on the right controlling various aspects of the title animation. From top to bottom, the selectors are:

Directional Selector (rectangle smiley-face peeking onto the icon): Controls the direction from which the layer's art enters the screen. The options are all arrows, and thus self-explanatory, except for the White Block option, indicating that the art will be in its final position on screen at the beginning of the animation.

Rotational Selector (tilted rectangular face): Controls the rotation speed of the layer's art. There are 3 options for clockwise rotation and 3 for counter-clockwise rotation. The thicker the arrow on the icon is, the faster the art will rotate. The White Block option indicates no rotation.

Squash/Strech Selector (streched-out oval face): Determines how (or if) the layer art is squashed/stretched into place. The options are all arrows, so self-explanatory. The White Block means that the art will appear at its final shape.

Art Size (rectangle smiley-face on a TV): Determines the total size of the layer's art. The three options for this are Normal (White Block), Large (Green Block inside large White Block), and Small (small White Block in Green Block).

In the bottom-left corner of the screen is the Animation button that allows you to set the art for each of the title layers.



Miscellaneous (computer with smiley-face): This button leads to a separate menu, more akin to Dezaemon Plus'. Selecting it will bring you to another screen with 4 options: Game Systems, Stage Data, Game BGM and Test Play.

Game Systems (Desk with papers on it): This controls a miscellany of game options. On the far left of the screen is a vertical selector that lets you modify settings for each level. You can turn a level into a cut scene by removing the player character from it (Spaceship icon, player will be present if it is glowing), select if objects in the level will cast shadows on the background (Character with shadow), or select if the level will be the official End level (Red button with an 'E'). Use the arrows at the top and bottom of the selector to scroll through the levels. To the immediate right of the level selector are options for the Scroll Type of the game. It can be set to Horizontal (Spaceship icon seen from the side) or Vertical (Spaceship icon seen from above). The currently glowing icon indicates the current scroll type. Note that if you change this, any existing map data for the game will be deleted.

Beneath the Scroll Type settings is a selector that lets you select the pause/menu noises for the game. The sounds come in 5 different varieties: Fantasy (Broom and stars), Future (Robot), Ninja (Ninja...), Military (Tank and airplane) and Sci-Fi (UFO).

To the right of the Scroll Type and Pause/Menu Sound Selector is the Font Window. The three selectors here allow you to change the font type (top-most), font color (middle) and font size (bottom). You have 8 font types, 8 font colors and 4 font sizes to pick from. Use the arrows on the sides of each selector until you find one you like.

Stage Data (Filing Cabinet): This option allows you to copy stage data from one stage to another, swap the data of two stages, or erase a stage completely. Selecting it brings you to the Stage Data screen, where you see two selectors showing the current stages. Use the arrows on the selectors until you find the data you want to swap or move and the place you want to move it to or swap it with, then use the buttons between the selectors to move (Single Arrow) or Swap (Two arrows forming a circle) the data. ALL data for the stage/s will be moved, including map and enemy data. If you want to erase a stage, use the eraser icon under the left selector and select the left option when Peron gives his Japanese “Are you sure?” message. The bomb on the right of the screen will delete all the data for all the stages. If you don't want to delete everything, select the right option when Peron gives his Japanese “Are you sure?” message.

Game BGM (Peron shaped into a music-note, singing): This option lets you set the Background Music for the various parts of the game. Unlike Dezaemon Plus, you do not have the ability to create your own music for this game, however there is a wide variety of music to select from. On the left side of the screen selecting this option brings you to, there is a list in Japanese of the various areas in the game that need music. From top to bottom, this list translates to:

Title
Stage Clear
Game Over
Name Entry
Stage 1 (Boss 1)
Stage 2 (Boss 2)
Stage 3 (Boss 3)
Stage 4 (Boss 4)
Stage 5 (Boss 5)
Stage 6 (Boss 6)

Select the area you want to put music to, then turn your attention to the right side of the screen. At the top of the BGM Select window there are two icons, one for the audio tracks provided by the game (Composer) and one for tracks on a music CD (CD). Note that the CD option is not actually usable if you're playing this game on a PSP.

Beneath these icons is a selector for the track being used in the current game area (Tadpole if you're using the sample music, CD if otherwise). You have 99 sample tracks (the sole text-only option being for no BGM) or however many tracks are on the CD. Beneath those are two sliders letting you set the level of echo (top) and volume (bottom). Sadly, these are the only options available for BGM.

Test Play (Peron and Paper Airplane): This starts the game in Test Play mode. Functionally speaking, this is identical to normal mode, but with extra options available on the start screen. In addition to the Start, Options and Exit, you get the following options:

Stage: Pick which stage you want to start on.
Muteki: This translates to “Invincible”. Setting it to 'on' makes you indestructible.
Bomb: Sets your bomb amount. Putting it to “No Limit” gives you infinite bombs.


Disc 2: Like was mentioned before, Dezaemon Kids comes with a second disc laden with games made with the Dezaemon Plus editor. In order to access the second disc, select “Reset Game” off the Home button menu, and select “Disc 2” when prompted. This will start up the second disc. On the main menu of this disc, you have 'Game', 'Easy Edit', 'Memory Card' and 'Config'. These options will be further explained in the following paragraphs.

'Game' brings you to a list of the numerous games on the disc. Selecting one of them will bring you to the game menu, where you can select to play the game, view comments by the creator of the game (MUCH more useful if you read Japanese) or save the game to Memory Card 2 so you can upload it to use in Dezaemon Plus. Note that not all games can be saved in this manner.

'Easy Edit' allows you to create your own game (of sorts) by taking stages from the 102 games on the disc and putting them together in any order you want. Selecting this option brings you to the Easy Edit screen, where you see 16 spots for levels and 1 spot for a ship. These spots will show the number of the game the stage has been taken from and the number of the stage in question. Highlight the level you want to add/edit and press Circle to see a preview of the stage map on the right side of the screen. This will be a circuit board pattern if there's nothing selected. Press Circle to access a list of the games you can select from, then use the up/down arrows to scroll to the game you want and press Circle again to access the game's level listing. Use left/right to scroll between the stages and press Circle to add the stage to your listing. Highlight the 'My Ship' option and press Circle to view the Player ships from all 102 games. Scroll over to the one you want with the D-pad and press Circle to select it. When you're all done, highlight 'Play' and press Circle to get this show on the road!

'Memory Card' allows you to save/load your assorted high-scores/Easy Edit data (Data Save and Data Load, respectively) and load a Dezaemon Plus game you have loaded on Memory Card 2 (Game Load). See the 'Importing' section below for instructions on how to move the game data.

Importing:
If you want to use the assorted game assets from the 102 games on this disc in your own Dezaemon Plus game-creation efforts, you will need to Import the data. To do so, follow these instructions and you'll be 'borrowing' art in no time!

Step 1: Load up Dezaemon Kids Disc 2 and navigate to the game you want to use.
Step 2: Use the 'GameSave' option (if present) to save the game you want to import to Memory Card 2.
Step 3: Exit out to the main PS3/PSP screen.
Step 4: Load up Dezaemon Plus.
Step 5: Open the Memory Card Utility, select the Memory Card you want to import to, then select Import.
Step 6: Find the Dezaemon Kids Memory Card 2 (the card will be full, with circular Peron icons in all 15 blocks), import the data to the Dezaemon Plus Memory Card.
Step 7: Exit the Memory Card utility, go to the Save/Load Menu in Dezaemon Plus, select Load, load the game from the Memory Card you imported to.
Step 8: Get to making use of the data.
Each of the sample games has an alternate version. To access it, select one of the games and when Peron gives his little message, quickly input the Konami Code (up up down down left right left right) and press Select.

If successful, the screen will shake, an explosion will sound and the game title will change. Then pick the left option to start playing the newly-modified game. Once you exit out of the game you’ll be able to access it in the Design sections.

Did you know you can grab and drag around the Dezaemon Kids logo?  

This article has 1 comments

  1. avatar
    Matty Robinson

    Hi, excellent job on getting all these titles on PSN.
    Is there any chance that Dezaemon Kids could be made available to PS Vita users?
    I’ve already got Dezaemon Plus, but would love to be able to get this one too.
    Thanks.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *